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20130201
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost -- certainly first several decades, people back in washington were saying, what have we done here? we've conquered this land but dough don't understand and it we can't good afternoon it. we should just give it back. give it back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence. there was slavery and there was hostage taking and -- just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. that's part two. part three is about kit carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people, and everything he did with that. monster slayer it's called, and this is from the final act of his long career, and it's probably what he is best known for, this sort of a scorched earth campaign he led into navajo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved lands, and this great experiment that went on to try to force the navajo to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living in this sort of reservation on the border with texas. so it's a b
. "our laws, our literature, our religion, our arts "all have their roots in greece. "but for greece, we might still have been savages and idolaters." the human form and the human mind attained to a perfection in greece which has impressed its image on those faultless productions whose very fragments are the despair of modern art and which can never cease to delight mankind until the extinction of the race. in the 18th and 19th centuries, europeans surrounded themselves with the images of greece and rome. they created for themselves personal museums which displayed their wealth, taste, and learning and idealized the virtues of reason, liberty, and justice. in this way, they elevated-- and even masked-- their mundane relationships with land ownership and manufacture, trade and empire, and they exported these ideals and the visual language which expressed them all over the world-- to the americas, the indies, and beyond. it is appropriate, then, that these are the first pictures we see in a series on the tradition of western art. we could have started in the caves of lascaux or the temples
on kpix 5, it's changed everything. >> reporter: for this family, hinduism is more than a religion. it's a way of life. but following a recent flight, that life has been dramatically altered. >> i thought something suspicious. >> reporter: not normal because it was the first time this 34- year-old hindu ever tasted meat. >> there was nothing written on the sandwich. >> reporter: he confirmed via e- mail that his families meals would be meat-free. once on board, the flight attendant assured him again. but a few bites in, he noticed an unfamiliar taste. >> eating meat is considered violent. >> so this is a sin? >> a grievous sin. >> reporter: the professor explains that for some families, hindu families, eating meat is a sin. accidentally eating it can be devastating. she compares it to accidentally eating a pet. >> there's a sense of deep revolution. >> reporter: he prays daily for forgiveness. he can no longer eat with his family. he must now travel back to india to perform his penance. >> was it intentional? no. but it's gross neglige
's great religions. it is a feast for the eyes and millions of pilgrims have already arrived. a sea of humanity on india's ganges river. we've waited 12 years for this festival to come around again so we sent holly williams to witness the spectacle. >> reporter: from every corner of india and by every conceivable mode of transport pilgrims are making their way to prayag, the holiest place in the hindu world for the biggest celebration on the hindu calendar the maha kumbh mela held only once every 12 years. born by their shared faith, they come here to purify themselves by bathing in the ganges the river that nurtured india's 5 civilization. om kumar is a wheat farmer from central india who told us he walked 300 miles to get here. why did you come from so far away? he made the journey, he said because the water has special power. for hindus the ganges suzuki a sacred river and they believe that bathing here during the kumbh mela will wash away their signs. the pilgrims have set up camp in a sprawling city of tents complete with banks, its own police force and traffic jams. but on sun
on tolerance, justice and where no discrimination based on religion, gender or ethnicity can be accepted. so, president, i'm very pleased to see that your government is defending marriage for all. [applause] >> translator: that is also our stance on the issue. change is afoot in france, president, but also in europe. we need to continue in order to create a fairer social europe, one that shows solidarity and one which is stronger on the global stage. your role is crucial, president. do not give in to the vision of a single market that mr. cameron sees. that's not our vision of europe. quite the contrary, in fact. you need to say to mrs. merkel, mr. president: angela, eisenhower, brant, schmidt, cole, all of these men had a vision of europe. help me to achieve our vision of europe. you've said that you would recreate the french vision when you were elected, and now in the council you can help breathe life back into the european vision. thank you. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: thank you very much, indeed. now on behalf of the united liberals and -- [inaudible] displt th
. the state has become the major religion in this country. the icons in washington -- they have to destroy every aspect of people who hold to a higher moral authority. host: the headline in this morning "the wall street journal" -- castle in michigan, on our lands for democrats. -- ethel in michigan, on our line for democrats. caller: my question is, what happened between the separation between church and state? i believe this is more of a legal issue than a religious issue. the religious issue is for the contraceptive. i can understand that. why is this being mixed in with state issues? he did not have to take them if you do not want them, if you do not believe in them. don't use them. i just cannot understand why this does not go away. i am really quite tired of it all. thank you. host: more from the article in this morning's "the wall street journal." they write -- the new rules would require insurers to pay the up-front cost. our next call comes from carol in ohio, on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. i am totally against what the catholic church and republicans are doing a
the swamp and what it does, it is radicalizing people that are standing up against militants using religion as a mobilizing force. so i think that drones as an instrument may have had some secrecy in terms of position, but -- and it's like saying, well, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in, we use our own to run anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so drones are now -- we don't see them as productive at all. >> what do you tell the germ's staff -- what do you tell the staff -- >> you need to be a fly on that committee wall. >> jonathan. >> i think we are all. on the same page. members of the general's staff on where the future of this -- pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door also. and in any case, you know that al qaeda is the whole al qaeda high valleys is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts. and that's something this administrati
using a religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. so i think drones as an instrument they have had some advocacy in terms of precision, but it's like saying we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come and for instance. to run anti-terror operations when we can come the women were able to move the protect them. so drones are now, we do see them as productive at all. >> what general staff comes to you and said we need -- [inaudible] >> excuse me? you need to be a very big fire that committee wall, wouldn't you? >> john mccain. >> career on the same page now come the members of general staff on where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there's been a lot of drones strikes next door, so in any case, you know al qaeda -- the whole al qaeda list is pretty much through our cooperation, a joint after a night spent in this administration will agree to also. >> you talk about the process in afghanistan being afghan led. president karzai had this
and pop really got religion now? >> i think the answer to that is no. january is seasonally a very good month, as halls been with the year-end reinvestment and pension contributions, has been a very good month for mutual funds. it's better than it was in the summer and autumn and winter. just last year. and so it's not the big pop that one would think you'd get. i, for one, think that's good. you know, when mutual fund investors pile into equities, it's usually a very negative sign for the market. so something like the dow going 14,000, i can contain my enthusiasm about that. it doesn't mean very much. >> and a lot of people have pointed out some of the records that we broke this month -- or i should say january, sort of were a reminder of the last time we set those records, which not too happy days were soon to follow, jack. >> well, yeah, you're right about that. it's even more dramatic if you go beyond the dow which has its advantages, and great limits. you go to the nasdaq, and that index is around 4,700 at its high in 2000. and now it's -- you tell me, 3,200 maybe. it's still fully
need to drain the swamp. instead it radicalizes people standing up using religion as a mobilizing force. host: the ambassador made a comment yesterday at a breakfast hosted by the christian science monitor. we covered it. c-span.org to what spoken. the washington times said the ambassador said that the attacks violate pakistani sovereignty and international law. the reaction from the aclu has been besthis -- ronnie in orlando, florida, independent. caller: thank you very much. i think it is absolutely outrageous, but it is just a continuation of outrageous policy that have gone on for the last almost 12 years now. i have to say that the previous caller, it just breaks my heart , in thinking that people that are objecting to these policies are against president obama along racial lines. this is not a racial issue. this is not a democrat versus republican issue. this is an issue that we americans are losing our democracy. our constitution is being shredded. gue natione nat internationally. in order to turn this around, which we have got to do, we did not lose 3,000 the law 9/11 to an outs
when i talk about freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not ha
standing up against militants and terrorists, using our religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. i think that drones as an instrument may have had some efficacy in terms of decisions, but we cannot allow us f-16's to come in. we use our own to run our anti- terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. drones are really -- we do not see them as productive at all. >> what would you tell the staff? what do you tell a member of the general staff? i think we are all on the same page now. members of the general staff and ourselves, where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door, and in any case you know that al qaeda, the whole -- through our cooperation and joint efforts, is pretty much degraded. that is something this administration will agree to also. >> james madison -- as british troops invaded the capital, she is known for saving eight portrait of george
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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